Hello friends and partners, we‘re excited to announce that due to continued growth and the support of many in our community, we‘re looking to hire a Prevention Program Manager!  We just completed our first 6 week program for teen boys, using the Not a Number cirriculum, and we are thrilled to be bringing Love 146 out to Fresno this April to train more of our staff!

Please spread the word to those you think may be interested in this opportunity to reach our community (especially young people) with a message of hope: together we WILL prevent human trafficking and exploitation. Deadline to submit resume and cover letter (to info@justiceco.org) is March 15.

Here’s a snapshot of the job description, and view the link below for complete a posting.

The Prevention Program Manager (PPM) provides oversight for programs related to prevention of human trafficking, in alignment with the mission and values of the Justice Coalition (CVJC).  This includes education, resourcing, training and intervention in the community. PPM will assist in the identification and resourcing of victims/survivors in the Central Valley as they connect to CVJC through programming. PPM will be responsible to identify and resource vulnerable communities and individuals primarily through education and intensive programs. He/she is also responsible to fundraise individually and as a team for the overall budget of the Justice Coalition through personal contacts, Justice Coalition contacts, and grant research writing.

Job Posting Prevention Program Manager

Sometimes people wonder why we, the Justice Coalition, get involved in advocacy in addition to education/direct service. There are many reasons behind our involvement in advocating for change relating to preventing human trafficking. For the sake of not going too far into tl;dr territory, here are the most important reasons.

  1. Scripture calls us to use our voices for those whose voices cannot be heard. Proverbs 31:8 (NIV) says “Speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves, for the rights of all who are destitute.”  Further, we see that God’s eyes are turned towards those who are oppressed.Psalms: 34: 15 – 18 (NIV) emphasizes that “The eyes of the LORD are on the righteous and his ears are attentive to their cry; the face of the LORD is against those who do evil, to cut off the memory of them from the earth. The righteous cry out, and the LORD hears them; he delivers them from all their troubles. The LORD is close to the brokenhearted and saves those who are crushed in spirit.”vlcsnap-2016-10-31-15h49m25s319
  2. Systemic oppression requires systemic change. Helping one person at a time is vital work but it won’t prevent someone else from being exploited in the future. One reason why traffickers have thrived is that our laws have been slow to change in order to reflect new realities. New legislation is needed to confront evolving criminal activities that enslave the vulnerable.IMG_0136
  3. In our system, elected officials are supposed to be accountable to the people who voted them into office. I get it, a lot of us don’t want to rely on the government to solve all of our problems. I hope that we all are doing something personally, individually to fight the evil of human trafficking. However, we need more than just individuals to combat modern-day slavery. Cartels and gangs are organized, powerful forces for evil. We need local, state and federal governments to get equally committed to fighting for justice. The reality is that we can’t solve this problem without the government, faith community, businesses, schools and community benefit organizations working together!Coalition-Group-Photo

Advocacy usually involves getting government, business, schools, or some other large institution (also known as Goliath) to correct an unfair or harmful situation affecting people in the community (also known as David, and friends). The situation may be resolved through persuasion, by forcing Goliath to buckle under pressure, by compromise, or through political or legal action. – Prue Breitrose

Learn more from the Community Tool Box, a resource from the University of Kansas

 

One of my favorite scenes from a movie this year comes from Logan, the darkly dystopian X-Men road movie. Regarding a family in need of help on the side of the road, Logan (played by Hugh Jackman) says to Patrick Stewart’s Professor X, “Someone will come along.”

“Someone has come along,” replies Xavier.

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I’ve thought about this scene often during the last month. Our organization is currently experiencing the growing pains that come from the transition from friendraising to fundraising. When I left Northpark Church to take over at Central Valley Justice Coalition, I relied on the support of people I’d known for a long time to help make the transition and raise the support necessary. Jessica, Kelly and Melissa had done the same before I got here.

At this point, we are now in need of people who will come along, basically out of nowhere. People who see the dire situation of human trafficking and don’t turn away. People who will step up for the cause and take a leap of faith on the people who are running point for the battle.

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I’ve had a number of people tell me that they would rather not know about the realities of human trafficking in our valley. Ignorance of the situation allowed them to have a naive comfort in the midst of the struggle and pain of others. I don’t think this is because they don’t have a heart. I think it’s because they feel like nothing can be done in the face of such overwhelming evil and exploitation.

But it isn’t true. Something can be done! And someone has come along. You are here now, reading this blog entry. What’s next?

Join our team and partner with us to prevent human trafficking in the Central Valley. Sign up to pray. Get involved as a volunteer. Pray, Give, Act.

Ryan Townsend, executive director.

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We are excited that word is spreading during our 50/50 Challenge, and local businesses are jumping on board to prevent trafficking in partnership with the Justice Coalition.

Jeb’s Blueberry Hill, a diner located on Saginaw and Blackstone, just a parking lot away from the Justice Coalition’s office, was the first to take the Challenge! Then, at our event last week, Sno Cafe caught the vision and is now a monthly partner as well!

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Stop by and check out the menu at Jeb’s Blueberry Hill
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great food and service for breakfast and lunch! 
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gourmet shave ice is to die for at Sno Cafe, a local dessert truck
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from our 50/50 TakeOver event, June 14, 2017

We are so grateful for them taking a stand with us and investing in prevention work in OUR COMMUNITY that changes people’s lives and brings freedom. We encourage you to check them out, and if you do, tell them thanks on behalf of the Justice Coalition!

Do you run a business or know of a business that needs to hear about our work?

We need MANY MORE business partners to come on board, take the 50/50 Challenge and commit at least $50 a month (or whatever one can start with, monthly or annually). Will you join personally, or even ask a business on our behalf? (We can provide a request letter (complete with tax credit information), a script for you to use, and even do the follow up work.) Email info@justiceco.org or call / message us today! 559.227.8001 (office)

To Join Us NOW sign up HERE!

For more info on what this money is being used for and other ways to give see our Donate page.

 

As part of our new data-gathering focus, we are proud to have partnered with Fresno Pacific University’s Center For Community Transformation to submit a formal report to the new mayoral administration’s far-reaching Fresno Public Policy Initiative.

This data will provide a basis for the initiation of a larger scale, comprehensive study in this geographic area to encourage a cooperative sharing of organizational data among anti-human trafficking entities.

Chaired by Dr. Randy White and Jessica Pittman, the paper is the result of a working group established to advise the city on a key issue related to public safety: human trafficking.

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Using data from 16 different anti-trafficking organizations, the report highlights best practices and makes recommendations for future city involvement and organization in partnership with Community Benefit Organizations and faith groups. Most importantly, this report recognizes the need to find uniform terminology and data collection methods that can allow for comprehensive data of the problem of trafficking. Solutions will be achievable as the scope of the problem becomes clear.

If you’d like to read the whole report, download it here.